Difference between revisions of "Fool in School"

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==Notes==
 
==Notes==
 
A "journey" through life. A journey to enlightenment. The key figure in a "deep spiritual journey"
 
<ref>Pollack, Rachel. Seventy Eight Degrees of Wisdom. Harper Collins, 1980. p. 155.</ref> A "journey in consciousness." (p. x). Through "experience" ... "we and the universe become one." (p. 110).
 
  
 
By suggesting you are a fool in school here to learn a cosmic/evolutionary lesson, the Fool in school constellation encourages servitude, passivity and the acceptance of the violence and toxicity that diminishes you and makes you into an appropriate vessel.  
 
By suggesting you are a fool in school here to learn a cosmic/evolutionary lesson, the Fool in school constellation encourages servitude, passivity and the acceptance of the violence and toxicity that diminishes you and makes you into an appropriate vessel.  
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Wirth provides an arrogant description of the fool as a "toy of occult powers," someone who is "easily influenced and it "incapable of resisting outside influences." "Subject to domination", with no free will. A slave<ref>Wirth, Oswald. Tarot of the Magicians: The Occult Symbols of the Major Arcana That Inspired Modern Tarot. San Francisco. CA: Weiser Books, 1990. p. 155</ref>. This person "does not count because of his lack of intellectual and moral existence."<ref>Wirth, Oswald. Tarot of the Magicians: The Occult Symbols of the Major Arcana That Inspired Modern Tarot. San Francisco. CA: Weiser Books, 1990. p. 153.</ref>
 
Wirth provides an arrogant description of the fool as a "toy of occult powers," someone who is "easily influenced and it "incapable of resisting outside influences." "Subject to domination", with no free will. A slave<ref>Wirth, Oswald. Tarot of the Magicians: The Occult Symbols of the Major Arcana That Inspired Modern Tarot. San Francisco. CA: Weiser Books, 1990. p. 155</ref>. This person "does not count because of his lack of intellectual and moral existence."<ref>Wirth, Oswald. Tarot of the Magicians: The Occult Symbols of the Major Arcana That Inspired Modern Tarot. San Francisco. CA: Weiser Books, 1990. p. 153.</ref>
  
==Examples==
+
 
 +
A "journey" through life. A journey to enlightenment. The key figure in a "deep spiritual journey"
 +
<ref>Pollack, Rachel. Seventy Eight Degrees of Wisdom. Harper Collins, 1980. p. 155.</ref> A "journey in consciousness." (p. x). Through "experience" ... "we and the universe become one." (p. 110).
 +
 
 +
"Today, we see the Tarot as a kind of path, a way to personal growth through understanding of ourselves and life. To some the Tarot's origin remains a vital question; for other s it only matters that meanings have accrued to the cards over the years."<ref>Pollack, Rachel. Seventy Eight Degrees of Wisdom. Harper Collins, 1980. p. 6.</ref>
  
 
The notion that we are here to learn life lessons is a prevalent archetype in Western esotericism. "...perfection is indeed the goal of every human life but that it may take many lifetimes to achieve...Failing to reach full realization in this life doesn't damn you to perdition; it simply means you'll have to come back again and again until you get it right."<ref>Smoley, Richard, and Jay Kinney. Hidden Wisdom: A Guide to Western Inner Traditions. Illinois: Quest Books, 2006.</ref>
 
The notion that we are here to learn life lessons is a prevalent archetype in Western esotericism. "...perfection is indeed the goal of every human life but that it may take many lifetimes to achieve...Failing to reach full realization in this life doesn't damn you to perdition; it simply means you'll have to come back again and again until you get it right."<ref>Smoley, Richard, and Jay Kinney. Hidden Wisdom: A Guide to Western Inner Traditions. Illinois: Quest Books, 2006.</ref>

Revision as of 12:43, 26 June 2020

The Fool in School is an Old Energy Archetype Constellation in the Old Energy Creation Template. It answers the Big Question "Who am I." The answer that is provided by this archetype is that you are a fool in a school incarnated on this Earth to learn (sometimes quite challenging) lessons. The Fool in School constellation is implemented in the Masonic Tarot

List of Archetypes related to the Fool in School Archetype Constellation

Fool in School > Chariot, Judgement, Star, Sun (archetype), Temperance, The Fool, The Magician, The Tower, The World (old energy)

List of Old Energy Archetypes from the Masonic Tarot

The Masonic Tarot consists of the following Old Energy archetypes.

Masonic Tarot archetypes> Chariot, Death (archetype), Hermit, Hierophant, High Priestess, Judgement, Justice, Star, Strength, Sun (archetype), Temperance, The Devil, The Emperor, The Empress, The Fool, The Hanged Man, The Lovers, The Magician, The Moon, The Tower, The Wheel of Fortune, The World (old energy)

List of Old Energy Archetype Constellations

The Old Energy Creation Template consists of the following Old Energy Archetype Constellations

Binary Gender, Chosen One, Compliance and Submission, Excuse and Justification, Fool in School, Good versus Evil, Judge and Punish/Reward, Only the Chosen, Secrets


Notes

By suggesting you are a fool in school here to learn a cosmic/evolutionary lesson, the Fool in school constellation encourages servitude, passivity and the acceptance of the violence and toxicity that diminishes you and makes you into an appropriate vessel.

This is an old energy archetypal constellation, from the Masonic Tarot. Its main archetypes include Justice, Hierophant, Judgement, and World (a.k.a. Universe)

"All suffering prepares the soul for vision." Martin Buber [1]

An "ordinary man." "Lower consciousness." [2] Undeveloped. Excluded. External to the temple.

Wirth provides an arrogant description of the fool as a "toy of occult powers," someone who is "easily influenced and it "incapable of resisting outside influences." "Subject to domination", with no free will. A slave[3]. This person "does not count because of his lack of intellectual and moral existence."[4]


A "journey" through life. A journey to enlightenment. The key figure in a "deep spiritual journey" [5] A "journey in consciousness." (p. x). Through "experience" ... "we and the universe become one." (p. 110).

"Today, we see the Tarot as a kind of path, a way to personal growth through understanding of ourselves and life. To some the Tarot's origin remains a vital question; for other s it only matters that meanings have accrued to the cards over the years."[6]

The notion that we are here to learn life lessons is a prevalent archetype in Western esotericism. "...perfection is indeed the goal of every human life but that it may take many lifetimes to achieve...Failing to reach full realization in this life doesn't damn you to perdition; it simply means you'll have to come back again and again until you get it right."[7]

In the Orphic Mysteries, the "soul is therefore a fallen angel doing penance for her sins. Her ultimate aim is to be released from her chains, and recover the inheritance she has lost. How are the prison-bars to be removed? As we lost our freedom through sin, so we cannot hope to regain it until the stain is purged away. In Orphic language, the soul must be made pure."[8]. See also Purification


M. Night Shyamalan's 2016 movie "Split" is a subtle and sophisticated representation of the Fool in School archetype. In Shyamalan's movie, to gain your full evolutionary potential, you need to suffer and be "broken." The "broken" (i.e. those damaged by Toxic Socialization to the point of beastly violence) are the ones who are pure of heart. They have special powers that allow them to "be whatever they think themselves to be." The rest will "never realize their full potential" and are consequently "sacred food" for the more evolved ones. In this movie, Shylaman encourages acceptance of the notion that violence and hardship are the "lessons" that create better humans.

"Not only so, but we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope." — St. Paul, Romans 5:3-4 (NIV)

"Misery Builds Character,' a common tv trope (https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/MiseryBuildsCharacter)

Israel Regardie notes that his "middle way" is all about the development of the self. "It is the pursuit of this middle path which leads to self-conquest and the steady growth of the Golden Flower, the wakening of the imprisoned soul within." [9]

Footnotes

  1. In Dossey. Recovering the Soul: A Scientific and Spiritual Search. Toronto: Bantam Books, 1989. p. 17
  2. Ouspensky, P. D. The Symbolism of the Tarot: Philosophy of Occultism in Pictures and Numbers. Mineola. St. Petersburg, Russia: Trood Print and Pub., 1913.
  3. Wirth, Oswald. Tarot of the Magicians: The Occult Symbols of the Major Arcana That Inspired Modern Tarot. San Francisco. CA: Weiser Books, 1990. p. 155
  4. Wirth, Oswald. Tarot of the Magicians: The Occult Symbols of the Major Arcana That Inspired Modern Tarot. San Francisco. CA: Weiser Books, 1990. p. 153.
  5. Pollack, Rachel. Seventy Eight Degrees of Wisdom. Harper Collins, 1980. p. 155.
  6. Pollack, Rachel. Seventy Eight Degrees of Wisdom. Harper Collins, 1980. p. 6.
  7. Smoley, Richard, and Jay Kinney. Hidden Wisdom: A Guide to Western Inner Traditions. Illinois: Quest Books, 2006.
  8. Adam, James. The Religious Teachers of Greece. Gifford Lectures. New Jersey: Reference Book Publishers, 1965. https://www.giffordlectures.org/books/religious-teachers-greece.
  9. Regardie, Israel. The Middle Pillar: The Balance Between Mind and Magic. St Paul, Minnesota: Llewellyn, 2004. p. 9.