Connection Supplement

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A Connection Supplement is a dietary supplement (like Cannabis, Psilocybin, Peyote) or substance (like DMT, LSD, Ketamine, MDMA, etc.) that forces and facilitates stronger Connection to Consciousness. Connection Supplements may also be referred to as psychedelics or entheogens ("God Containing"). Since the action of entheogens is to open a Connection to The Fabric of Consciousness, Connection Supplement is the superior term.

Syncretic Terms

Entheogen, Psychedelic (mind-opening), Psycholytic (mind-releasing)[1]

Technologies of the Sacred

List of Connection Supplements

Connection Supplement > Cannabis, Chloroform, DMT, Haoma, Kaneh Bosm, Kava, Ketamine, Kykeon, LSD, MDMA, Nitrous Oxide, Peyote, Psilocybin, Soma

Notes

Connection supplements induce Awakening Experiences: "These drugs are not narcotics, sedatives, or energizers, but have the unique effect on the human psyche of bringing into awareness forms of consciousness that are usually hidden or unconscious" [2]

Bennett notes the use of Connection Supplements in ancient religions and esoteric practices [3]

There was serious interest in connection supplements in the late 1950s and early 1960s.[4] Pahnke notes, however, resistance and pushback to the potential of connection supplements. "In the midst of this experimental ferment, however, we are confronted by the very real possibility that the known and unknown uses of these drugs that could prove to be legitimate and beneficial for individual persons and society may be suppressed until some future century when investigation will be permitted to proceed unhampered by popular hysteria and over-restrictive legislation. In the United States, interested and capable scientists are hesitating to investigate this field because of the abundance of unfavorable publicity and the threat of condemnation by identification with irresponsible researchers." [5]

Pahnke and Richards [6] summarize early evidence indicating that the connection experiences induced by connection supplements are similar, if not identical, to spontaneous connection experience.

Timothy Leary notes "sacred mushrooms" sent him on a five-hour connection experience that was "without question the deepest religious experience of my life."[7] Leary also suggested that "between 40 and 90 percent of psychedelic subjects report intense religious experience."[8]

Klavetter and Mogar note that LSD can trigger "an experience highly similar to the more inclusive peak experience..."[9] The authors also note that the "nature, intensity, and content of the psychedelic state are the result of complex transactions between the subject's past history and personality, the set and expectancies of both subject and administrator,and the physical and psychological milieu in which the experience"[10]

Griffiths et. al note that Psilocybin "increased measures of mystical experience. At 2 months, the volunteers rated the psilocybin experience as having substantial personal meaning and spiritual significance and attributed to the experience sustained positive changes in attitudes and behavior consistent with changes rated by community observers."[11]

Evelyn Underhill references "Alice-in-Wonderland's mushroom" as capable of putting one in touch with more fundamental aspects of reality.[12]

Reacting to a "growing chorus of claims...suggesting that the ingestion of certain drugs (e.g., mescaline and LSD) can induce experiences profoundly 'religion' in significance," Oaks[13] denies, on philosophical grounds, the possibility that connection supplements can induce religious (i.e., connection) experience.

The healing potential of Connection Supplements has been recently rediscovered[14], though as we can see, serious interest was displayed over a century ago. Interest waned as a consequence of elite pushback against the progressive potential of Connection Supplements[15].

Cultural Usage of Connection Supplements

Anthropologist Margaret Mead noted that Kava, which is used to produce a mild entheogenic drink, was consumed daily by Samoan men and women in a ritual where the "talking chief...serves the kava."[16]

Details

Connection supplements vary in intensity of connection and duration of effect.

Regarding intensity and duration, LSD has high intensity and long duration, while cannabis has lower intensity and lower duration. Note that there is a considerable difference in duration between cannabis that is inhaled and cannabis that is ingested. When inhaled, duration is typically 90 minutes. When ingested, duration is approximately six hours.

In general, guidance from experienced and authentic new energy guides is recommended, especially when attempting connection with more intense substances.

To achieve successful, grounded, aligned, non-paranoid, fear-less connection, it is important to establish Aligned Thought, Aligned Environment, and Aligned Action. Lightning Path materials, and in particular the Triumph of Spirit Archetype System, are designed to help facilitate alignment. To get started on the Lightning Path, visit https://www.lightningpath.org/.

Set and Setting, another way of looking at Aligned Thought and Aligned Environment, is important. Connection supplements do not invariably lead to Connection Experiences As Huston notes, "given the right set and setting, the drugs can induce religious experiences that are indistinguishable from such experiences that occurs spontaneously.[17]

Neurology is not well understood at this time, but it appears that connection is facilitated via suppression of the Default Mode Network (Sosteric, SOA) and activation of unused neural pathways.

In regards to cannabis, the cannabinoid receptors (CB1) are located throughout the body, in the brain, liver, lungs fat cells, uterus, and sperm!. When either endogenous or exogenous cannabinoids are present, these bind to the receptors and trigger a "cornucopia" of chemical signals. See also this. Cannabis is thus likely involved in more than just the facilitation of connection.

Further Reading

Sharp, Michael (BOOK1). Lightning Path Workbook One: Introduction to Authentic Spirituality. Lightning Path Press. [1]

Sosteric, Mike and Ratkovic, Gina (2019,BOOK2). Lightning Path Workbook Two: Healing. Lightning Path Press. [2]

Sharp, Michael (BOOK3). Lightning Path Workbook Three: Connection. Lightning Path Press. [3]



Footnotes

  1. Pahnke, Walter N., and William A. Richards. “Implications of LSD and Experimental Mysticism.” Journal of Religion and Health 5, no. 3 (1966): 175–208. https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01532646.
  2. Pahnke, Walter N., and William A. Richards. “Implications of LSD and Experimental Mysticism.” Journal of Religion and Health 5, no. 3 (1966): 175–208. https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01532646. p. 175
  3. Bennett, Chris. LIber 420: Cannabis, Magickal Herbs and the Occult. Walterville, OR: Trine Day, 2018.
  4. Pahnke, Walter N., and William A. Richards. “Implications of LSD and Experimental Mysticism.” Journal of Religion and Health 5, no. 3 (1966): 175–208. https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01532646. p. 175
  5. Pahnke, Walter N., and William A. Richards. “Implications of LSD and Experimental Mysticism.” Journal of Religion and Health 5, no. 3 (1966): 175–208. https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01532646. p. 175-76
  6. Pahnke, Walter N., and William A. Richards. “Implications of LSD and Experimental Mysticism.” Journal of Religion and Health 5, no. 3 (1966): 176. https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01532646. p. 175
  7. Leary, T. “The Religious Experience: Its Production and Interpretation.” Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 3, no. 1 (1970): 76–86. https://doi.org/10.1080/02791072.1970.10471364. p. 324
  8. Leary, T. “The Religious Experience: Its Production and Interpretation.” Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 3, no. 1 (1970): 76–86. https://doi.org/10.1080/02791072.1970.10471364. p. 345
  9. Klavetter, Robert E., and Robert E. Mogar. “Peak Experiences: Investigation of Their Relationship to Psychedelic Therapy and Self-Actualization.” Journal of Humanistic Psychology 7, no. 2 (1967): 171.
  10. Klavetter, Robert E., and Robert E. Mogar. “Peak Experiences: Investigation of Their Relationship to Psychedelic Therapy and Self-Actualization.” Journal of Humanistic Psychology 7, no. 2 (1967): 171.
  11. Griffiths, R. R., W. A. Richards, U. McCann, and R. Jesse. “Psilocybin Can Occasion Mystical-Type Experiences Having Substantial and Sustained Personal Meaning and Spiritual Significance.” Psychopharmacology 187, no. 3 (2006): 268. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00213-006-0457-5
  12. Underhill, Evelyn. Mysticism: A Study in the Nature and Development of Spiritual Consciousness. New York: Dover Publications, 2002. https://amzn.to/2C91xNY.
  13. Oakes, Robert A. “Biochemistry and Theistic Mysticism.” Sophia 15, no. 2 (July 1976): 10–16. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02798899.
  14. Neitzke-Spruill, Logan, and Carol Glasser. “A Gratuitous Grace: The Influence of Religious Set and Intent on the Psychedelic Experience.” Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 50, no. 4 (October 9, 2018): 314–21. https://doi.org/10.1080/02791072.2018.1494869.
  15. Sosteric. Rocket Scientists’ Guide to Authentic Spirituality. St. Albert, Alberta: Lightning Path Press, 2018. https://amzn.to/2Vnr4L4.
  16. Mead, Margaret. The Coming of Age in Samoa: A Psychological Study of Primitive Youth for Western Civilization. Kindle. New York: William Morrow, 2016. https://amzn.to/2D4znnX
  17. Huston, Smith. Cleansing the Doors of Perception. Boulder, CO: Sentient Publications, 2000. p. 20. https://amzn.to/2tZmoPw
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