Magic

The word Magic refers to the manipulation of creation without a concomitant material intervention.

Syncretic Terms

Creation Practice > Magic, Magick

Related Terms

Magic > Focus, Force, Mana, Miwi

Notes

Aleister Crowley defined magick as "The science and art of causing change to occur in conformity with will." As much as I really dislike the man and his मोह writings, he was bang on with this definition.

Spencer Rogers identifies several forms of magic, including sympathetic magic, imitative magic, contagious magic. Imitative magic' is magic based on imitation--what happens to the picture or figure of a person happens to the person. Contagious magic is magic conducted on objects that have been in contact with a person (hair, a person's possession). Repetition magic involves the repetition of formula, prayer, or incantations. In all cases, this form of magic is an attempt to focus and discipline intent.

Contrary to fundamentalist belief, the early medieval Christian Church as OK with the idea of magic. According to this Wikipedia article, "The fierce denunciation and persecution of supposed sorceresses that characterized the cruel witchhunts of a later age were not generally found in the first thirteen hundred years of the Christian era. The medieval Church distinguished between "white" and "black" magic. Local folk practice often mixed chants, incantations, and prayers to the appropriate patron saint to ward off storms, to protect cattle, or ensure a good harvest. Bonfires on Midsummer’s Eve were intended to deflect natural catastrophes or the influence of fairies, ghosts, and witches. Plants, often harvested under particular conditions, were deemed effective in healing."

Magical Formula: Force + Formation = Creation.

"Consciousness is not bound by the constraints of physical creation," (Sharp, BOLIFE) though consciousness certainly is.

Israeli Regardie of Golden Dawn fame psychologized magic and made it into a "technical system" for psychological development, particularly the "integration of the human personality..." and "bringing into operation the creative and intuitive parts of man [sic]" [1]

Footnotes

  1. Regardie, Israel. The Middle Pillar: The Balance Between Mind and Magic. St Paul, Minnesota: Llewellyn, 2004. p. 6-7