Intent

From The SpiritWiki

Intent is the conscious, mindful desire to achieve some creative end, to act, to do something, to accomplish some task in the world. Intent to Connect is the application of intent to the accomplishment of Connection.

Syncretic Terms

Intent > Mantra, Shraddha, Will-Prayer

List of Connection Techniques

Connection Technique > {{#ask:Connection Technique

Related Terms

Intent > Affirmation, Connection Practice, Creation Practice, Focus, Intent to Connect, Toxic Intent, Visualization

Notes

Intent is the application of Desire and Will to creation.

Intent may be focussed via Affirmation and Visualization.

Intent is an important component of the psychological/spiritual process.

Intent, variously understood, is a common precursor to healing and connection. Thus Bill Smith, founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, was cured when he finally hit rock bottom and intended a connection to God.

Intent (framed as "suggestion" by Akhilananda and other vedic practitioners[1]) is a critical tool that can help in the healing and connection process.

  • "The beginning of spiritual life is conversion, an attitude of the will turning towards God and renouncing the world."[2]
  • Zoroaster's mystical experiences were precedent by intent, an "ardent desire" to meet Vohu Manah. [3]

For more examples, see Intent to Connect

Intent is an important component of the creative process.

When a potter sits down at a wheel to spin a vase, his desire to spin a vase, coupled with the will to get it done, is instrumental in the force used to form the new creation.

When we intend something we take a desired creative outcome and direct it (i.e. will it) to happen with the force of Consciousness.

How long it takes to translate intent into creation depends entirely on the persistence and strength of will (i.e. the harder you will it, the faster it will happen), the nature and complexity of our creative intent, our general creative expertise, and the energetic level at which you are creating at. At lower (i.e. denser) levels of physical Creation where Creation vibrates slower, intent requires additional time and effort. Obviously, more complex creative outcomes require longer periods of intense creative intent and more time (and perhaps assistance) to properly unfold.

Intent, when unified , can have a "tremendous influence on the body....involuntary actions of muscles can be kept under control ... and persons ... can ... change the rhythm and tempo of the circulatory systems with mental control. Human appetites, such as hunger and thirst, can be appeased by the will; in fact, physical ailments can also be removed. We often hear of mental healing. It is true that there are many fraudulent cases, yet there are also many authentic cases of mental healing all over the world. "[4]

"Extrasensory perceptions of various types are attained by the unified will;"[5]

Intent can be influenced by suggestion and hypnosis.[6]

We must refine our ability to intend through mental and emotional healing and practice.

  • Intent requires faith in ourselves; it requires the "conviction of power and the desire to translate ... into action." [7] We must cultivate this faith. Eliminate people and avoid situations that undermine your faith in self.
  • Intent requires consistent and pure focus.[8] A mind that jumps from interest to interest, a mind that runs riot, a mind unduly influenced and cast about by emotions will be unable to maintain consistent and persistent intent. Therefore, we must cultivate "purity and one-pointedness of mind." [9]
  • Intent requires discipline. Laziness and distractions which impeded purity and one-pointedness of mind undermine intent and dilute action and energy. [10]
  • Intent requires a healthy body else the body and mind lack energy and focus.[11] Therefore, eat right, exercise, get enough sleep, avoid toxic substances.
  • Intent requires a healthy Bodily Ego free of unconscious influences, repressed trauma, suppressed awareness, Disjuncture, and so on.

Intent is an Aspect of Consciousness and part of Creation's Equation.

Intent may be contrasted with Expectation.

Footnotes

  1. Akhilananda, Swami. Hindu Psychology: Its Meaning in the West. Routledge, 1948.
  2. Lossky, Vladimir. The Mystical Theology of the Eastern Church. New York: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 2002. p. 199.
  3. Dhalla, Maneckji Nusservanji. History of Zoroastrianism. New York: Oxford University Press, 1938. p. 33.
  4. Akhilananda, Swami. Hindu Psychology: Its Meaning in the West. Routledge, 1948. p. 87.
  5. Akhilananda, Swami. Hindu Psychology: Its Meaning in the West. Routledge, 1948. p. 87.
  6. Akhilananda, Swami. Hindu Psychology: Its Meaning in the West. Routledge, 1948. p. 87.
  7. Akhilananda, Swami. Hindu Psychology: Its Meaning in the West. Routledge, 1948. p. 80.
  8. Akhilananda, Swami. Hindu Psychology: Its Meaning in the West. Routledge, 1948.
  9. Akhilananda, Swami. Hindu Psychology: Its Meaning in the West. Routledge, 1948. p. 82.
  10. Akhilananda, Swami. Hindu Psychology: Its Meaning in the West. Routledge, 1948. p. 82.
  11. Akhilananda, Swami. Hindu Psychology: Its Meaning in the West. Routledge, 1948. p. 83.