Power Quest

A Power Quest (a.k.a. Vision Question)[1] is the shamanic term for the coordinated indigenous practice of inducing a Connection Experience through Intent, Fasting, Deprivation, Drumming, Connection Supplements, etc.

List of Connection Practices

Connection Practice > Affirmation of Compassion, Affirmation of Self, Bornless Ritual, Cocooning, Detachment, Fasting, Flow Purification, Holotropic Breathwork, Hypnotism, Hypoventilation, Intent, Magic, Meditation, Mysticism of the Historical Event, Power Quest, Receptive Seeking, Relaxation, Spirit Canoe, The Method of the Lamp, Vajra Breath, Vision Quest, Visualization, Wicca, Writing, Yoga, Zazen

List of Connection Techniques

Connection Technique > Affirmation of Compassion, Affirmation of Self, Connection Affirmation, Connection Visualization, Deprivation, Detachment, Drumming, Fasting, Flow Purification, Great Invocation, Hypnotism, Hypoventilation, Intent to Connect, Mysticism of the Historical Event, Poetry, The Way of the Hollow Bone, Thought Control

Related Terms

Activation, Activation Experience, Power Archetype

Notes

Powers quests are conducted for reasons of health, survival, connecting with the power of Consciousness, and in order to acquire to heal others.[2] Why? Because connection gives you access to the power of Consciousness.

In his book Cave and Cosmos, Michael Harner describes his own successful power quest. [3] In his description, he has an Animal Power Encounter Harner further suggests that paleolithic cave paintings or recording of ancient power questions and the encounters with animal powers. See the discussion tab for a full accounting.

"In the more extreme form of the Plains vision or power quest, the seeker would be wrapped in a blanket or quilt and placed in the ground in an L-shaped hole that had already been constructed and used previously. The vision seeker’s sacred pipe was included. The hole would then be covered to reduce light so that the person would be better able to have visionary experiences both day and night, and to increase suffering through isolation, sensory deprivation, and cold. The suffering was heightened by not being allowed to drink water at any time after the sweat lodge or during the quest."[4]

"Among some Inuit of the Arctic, one way to have a successful quest for power was to spend four or five days in a special isolated igloo in the depths of winter without food or water. When the specified time elapsed, an elder, usually a shaman, opened the igloo and brought the person home. The igloo did not have even an oil lamp to heat it, so the suffering from extreme cold was combined with suffering from lack of water and food." [5]

Footnotes

  1. Harner, Michael. Cave and Cosmos: Shamanic Encounters with Another Reality. Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books, 2013.
  2. Harner, Michael. Cave and Cosmos: Shamanic Encounters with Another Reality. Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books, 2013.
  3. Harner, Michael. Cave and Cosmos: Shamanic Encounters with Another Reality. Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books, 2013.
  4. Harner, Michael. Cave and Cosmos: Shamanic Encounters with Another Reality. Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books, 2013.
  5. Harner, Michael. Cave and Cosmos: Shamanic Encounters with Another Reality. Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books, 2013.