Transformational Change

From The SpiritWiki

Transformation Change is a Connection Outcome that leads to Enhanced Psychological Function. According to William White, Transformational Change [TC] is a sudden, dramatic healing (for example, instant recovery from alcoholism) that can "forever rend a life into the temporal categories of before and after and leave in their psychological wake an essentially new person."[1].

Syncretic Terms

Enhanced Psychological Function > Transformational Change

List of Connection Outcomes

Connection Outcome > Absolute Sensation, Activation, Alignment, Altered State of Consciousness, Ananda, Arendi, Ascension, Awakening, Beatific Vision, Bliss, Bodhisattva, Breakthrough, Buddha Mind, Center, Christ Consciousness, Clarification of Consciousness, Clarity, Connection Psychosis, Consciousness of Presence, Cosmic Bliss, Cosmic Consciousness, Cosmic Religious Feeling, Daigo, Dark Night of the Soul, Direct Mental Interaction With Living Systems, Dissonance, Déjà vu, ESP, Ecstasy, Egoic Collapse, Egoic Explosion, Emotional Cleansing, Emotional Satisfaction, Enhanced Creativity, Enhanced Intellectual Function, Enhanced Psychological Function, Enlightenment, Epiphany, Existential Terrors, Expansion of Meaning, Experience of Admixture, Feeling of Immortality, Flooding, Gifts of the Spirit, Glimpse, Gnosis, Happiness, Healing, Improved Relationships, Insight, Intramonadic Communication, Kensho, Language, Liberation, Love, MEPF, Mahabbah, Meanification, Moksha, Moral Quickening, Morality, Mushi-dokugo, Noesis, Oceanic Feeling, Past Life Memories, Perfect Contemplation, Perfection, Permanent Connection, Physical Sensations, Piercing The Veil, Positive Affect, Power over the Material World, Psychotic Mysticism, Pure Consciousness Event, Quantum Change, Rapture, Realization of Immortality, Realization of Self, Recollection, Religious Ecstasy, Revelation, Ritambharapragya, Shogo, Spiritual Emergence, Spiritual Emergency, Spiritual Marriage, Spontaneous Alignment, Telepathy, Teleportation, The Family of Spirit, The Unity, Tolerance, Transcendence, Transformation, Transsubjectivity, Triumph of Spirit, Turn to the Left, Union, Union with God, Union with Reality, Unity, Warmth

Notes

White identifies five characteristics of TC which are a) sudden, unplanned, and unanticipated, b) vivid, c) comprehensive (as in a comprehensive and revolutionary change in character), d) positive, and e) enduring. White also outlines clinical implications for practitioners dealing with an individual who has experienced a TC event.

TC is related/another name for Quantum Change. In LP nomenclature, TC is an outcome of a combination of a Clearing Experience + Awakening Experience + (possibly) Unity Experience

"The evidence of such transformation exists in radical and sustained alterations of character, identity, and interpersonal relationships."[2]

Transformational change has a propensity to "catalyze large religious, social, and therapeutic movements."[3]

Examples cited by William include Saul of Tarsus, Mohammed, Buddha, Luther, Handsome Lake, Bill Wilson (Alcoholics Anonymous), Marty Mann, and Malcolm X).

TC often occurs at rock bottom, and often occurs during periods of "great social unrest within their cultural environments."[4]

Generally occur later in life, 25-64. [5]

Include a religious and secular variety.[6]

Miller and C'de baca note an insightful versus mysticaltype (see Quantum Change).

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  1. White, William L. “Transformational Change: A Historical Review.” Journal of Clinical Psychology 60, no. 5 (May 2004): 461.
  2. White, William L. “Transformational Change: A Historical Review.” Journal of Clinical Psychology 60, no. 5 (May 2004): 461.
  3. White, William L. “Transformational Change: A Historical Review.” Journal of Clinical Psychology 60, no. 5 (May 2004): 461.
  4. White, William L. “Transformational Change: A Historical Review.” Journal of Clinical Psychology 60, no. 5 (May 2004): 461.
  5. White, William L. “Transformational Change: A Historical Review.” Journal of Clinical Psychology 60, no. 5 (May 2004): 464.
  6. White, William L. “Transformational Change: A Historical Review.” Journal of Clinical Psychology 60, no. 5 (May 2004): 461.