Subjugated Knowledge

Subjugated Knowledge (also called Marginal Knowledges)[1] are knowledges that have been disqualified from consideration due to the fact that they have been deemed as inadequate or insufficiently elaborated.[2]

Related Terms

Subjugated Knowledge > Creation Template

Notes

Indigenous spiritualities are examples of subjugated knowledge. See for example Lawlor [3]

Foucault elaborates on methods by which knowledge is subjugated, and also methods of criticism that can excavate these knowledges. For an excellent introduction to Foucault, see "A Foucault Primer: Discourse, power, and the subject."[4]


Footnotes

  1. McHoul, Alec, and Wendy Grace. A Foucault Primer: Discourse, Power and the SUbject. New York: Routledge, 1993.
  2. Foucault, M. Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings. London: Harvester Press, 1980. p. 82
  3. Lawlor, Robert. Voices of the First Day: Awakening in the Aboriginal Dreamtime. Rochester, Vermont: Inner Traditions, 1991.
  4. McHoul, Alec, and Wendy Grace. A Foucault Primer: Discourse, Power and the SUbject. New York: Routledge, 1993.