Religion

From The SpiritWiki

Religion is an Ideological Institution setup and organized by the Accumulating Classes to satisfy one or more of our Seven Essential Needs by providing System friendly satisfactions.

Related Terms

Religion > Sacrilization

Other Definitions

We can break sociological definitions of religion into two categories substantive and functional.

Substantive definitions revolve around the content (or substance) of a religion. Like, religion is the belief in spiritual beings[1] What religion is.

Sociologists and others who have provided substantive definitions -> Emile Durkheim, Georg Simmel, Joachim Wach, Melford Spiro, Romain Rolland, Sigmund Freud

Functional definitions "describe the utility of the effect of that religion" on individuals and society.[2] What religion does.

Sociologists and others who have provided functional definitions -> Clifford Geertz, Emile Durkheim, Georg Simmel, Joachim Wach, Melford Spiro, Romain Rolland, Sigmund Freud

Notes

Religions satisfy our Cognitive Needs to know and understand by providing Regime of Accumulation friendly answers.

Religions are typically constructed by elite members of the Accumulating Class for the purposes of social control.

  • Zoroastrianism co-opted by Aradashir.[3]
  • Co-optation of progressive Christianity by Constantine[4]
  • Tarot created by Freemasons as an ideological tool for Capitalists.[5]
  • The Aztecs using their cosmological order to support, I think, a four-class political system, and a productive system with a focus on excellence and productivity. [6] Rulers, warriors, merchants, and commoners (farmers, stonecutters, caprenters, shopkeepers, clay workers candlesellers, etc.... Interesting that the Aztec religious rituals were also used to instruct the "next generation" of rulers. At the coronation ceremony, the new Aztec big-guy was metaphorically instructed about his primary responsibility, which was to maintain social caste order and social cohesion, and also to engage in Imperial wars.

The new ruler is warned about coming problems: "In thy time there will be disunity, quarreling in thy city. No more wilt thou be esteemed, no more wilt thou be regarded. Also war will move upon thee." But the ruler is encouraged to stand up to all troubles, for he is the living, present image of the god who governs all things: "Put forth all thy effort, give all, put forth all thy spirit. Sigh, be sad; call out in sadness to our lord, to the lord of the near, of the nigh... . Be not a fool. May thou not speak hurriedly, may thou not interrupt, may thou not confound. Take yet, grasp yet, arrive yet at the truth, for, it is said and it is true, thou art the replacement, thou art the image of the lord of the near, of the nigh....As the living image of the god who is close to all living things, the ruler's chief job is to ensure order, arrangement, and proper location so that the Aztec way of life can continue in the face of real dangers. [7] Aztec rituals also guided the thoughts and actions of merchants and warriors.

This definition excludes grass roots Connection Framework, spiritual systems rooted in Connection Experience. As soon as a Connection Framework is infiltrated and co-opted by members of the Accumulating Class, the spiritual system transforms into a Religion.

Origins

Sigmund Freud suggest religious ideas arise from

  1. an expression of the son-father relationship (see totem and taboo, related to religions where "totem animals" become sacred)[8]
  2. the need to defend oneself against the "crushingly superior force of nature."[9]
  3. The "urge to rectify the shortcoming of civilization..."[10]

Footnotes

  1. Tylor, Edward. Primitive Culture. London: John Murray, 1903. Note, Tylor's theory later criticized as evolutionary and ethnocentric (not all religions believe in or emphasize "spiritual beings" (Confucianism). Distinguished between "primitive" and "modern" spirituality, lower versus higher forms.
  2. Furseth, Inger, and Pål Repstad. An Introduction to the Sociology of Religion: Classical and Contemporary Perspectives. Aldershot, England: Ashgate Publishing Limited, 2006. p. 16.
  3. Sosteric, Mike. “From Zoroaster to Star Wars, Jesus to Marx: The Art, Science, and Technology of Human Manipulation,” . https://www.academia.edu/34504691.
  4. Sosteric, Mike. “Rethinking the Origins and Purpose of Religion: Jesus, Constantine, and the Containment of Global Revolution.” Athens Journal of Social Sciences 9, no. 1 (2020): 69–88.
  5. Sosteric, Mike. “A Sociology of Tarot.” Canadian Journal of Sociology 39, no. 3 (2014). https://www.academia.edu/25055505/.
  6. Carrasco, David, and Scott Sessions. Daily Life of the Aztecs. London: Greenwood Press, 1998.
  7. Carrasco, David, and Scott Sessions. Daily Life of the Aztecs. London: Greenwood Press, 1998. p. 136.
  8. Freud, Sigmund. The Future of an Illusion. New York: Anchor Books, 1961. p. 21
  9. Freud, Sigmund. The Future of an Illusion. New York: Anchor Books, 1961. p. 21
  10. Freud, Sigmund. The Future of an Illusion. New York: Anchor Books, 1961. p. 21