Flow Experience

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A Flow Experience is an experience of being "totally involved" [1] "totally involved" in an activity. In this experience, Bodily Ego is set aside and Spiritual Ego takes control of the Physical Unit.

List of Connection Experience Types

Activation Experience, Ascension Experience, Awakening Experience, Clearing Experience, Completion Experience, Dream Experience, Flow Experience, Forced Connection, Healing Experience, Intuitive Glimmering, Nadir Experience, Push Experience

List of Connection Outcomes

Absolute Sensation, Activation, Alignment, Ascension, Awakening, Bodhisattva, Breakthrough, Breakthrough Experience, Buddha Mind, Christ Consciousness, Clarity, Consciousness of Presence, Cosmic Consciousness, Cosmic Religious Feeling, Daigo, Dark Night of the Soul, Dissonance, Déjà vu, ESP, Ecstasy, Emotional Cleansing, Emotional Satisfaction, Enhanced Intellectual Power, Enlightenment, Epiphany, Expansion of Meaning, Experience of Admixture, Feeling of Immortality, Flooding, Gifts of the Spirit, Glimpse, Healing, Improved Relationships, Insight, Intramonadic Communication, Kensho, Love, MEPF, Meanification, Moksha, Moral Quickening, Mushi-dokugo, Noesis, Perfect Contemplation, Perfection, Physical Sensations, Piercing The Veil, Positive Affect, Power over the Material World, Psychotic Mysticism... further results

Notes

Flow experiences are generally weak Connection Experiences with a focus on personal content (see Connection Axes). The individual may or may not be aware of the "flow" of their Spiritual Ego.

Flow experiences are identified by Csikszentmihalyi.[2]

Flow experiences are typically associated with activities (games, mountain climbing, etc.) one is competent in. In a flow experience, one's attention becomes highly focussed on the activity, one merges with the action itself, one's becomes certain of one's actions.

Flow experiences are autotelic, meaning the motivation and joy is in the activity itself, and not in any end goal (like winning, or for money).

Csikszentmihalyi speculates about conditions that would encourage flow experiences. The gist is that the activity should neither be too simple as to induce boredom or too complex as to induce anxiety and self-doubt.


Footnotes

  1. Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly. “Play and Intrinsic Rewards.” Journal of Humanistic Psychology 15, no. 3 (1975): 43.
  2. Csikszentmihalyi, Mihaly. “Play and Intrinsic Rewards.” Journal of Humanistic Psychology 15, no. 3 (1975): 41-63.
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