Arendiwane

From The SpiritWiki

Arendiwane are Huron "master shamans. Arendiwane use Dream Experiences to gain power, diagnose and heal illnesses, and harm others. [1]

Related Terms

Huron > Arendiwane, Gonennoncwal, Oki, Ondinoc

Indigenous Spiritualities

Indigenous Spiritualities > Huron

Syncretic Terms

Mystic > Arendiwane, Karadji, Shaman, Shamanic Principle, Wise One

Notes

Arendiwane gather their expertise as a consequence of "years of dream interpretation...and on instructions which had been received through visions..." [2]

"The arendiwane was also believed to have the power to look directly into the soul of others and to see their ondinoc, even that of a newborn child.23 Shamans also had special powers received in dreams to control the weather, see into the future and locate missing individuals or objects."[3]

"The Arendiwane, "great, powerful one" was the master shaman who had many such dreams and the appropriate knowledge and practices given by the various oki. If the degree of identification with those mythic beings was great enough, giving them an ability to see into the souls of others and to diagnose illness and other types of disturbance, then the Arendiwane was also addressed as oki."[4]

Killing A shaman who wished to harm someone could send his oki after the offender’s soul to make it inhabit a stone or some other physical object; the shaman could then strike the object causing his victim’s body to fall ill and possibly die.[5]

"The arendiwane was also believed to have the power to look directly into the soul of others and to see their ondinoc, even that of a newborn child."[6]

Footnotes

  1. Irwin, Lee. “Myth, Language and Ontology among the Huron.” Studies in Religion/Sciences Religieuses 19, no. 4 (December 1, 1990): 413–26. p. 418. https://doi.org/10.1177/000842989001900403.
  2. Irwin, Lee. “Myth, Language and Ontology among the Huron.” Studies in Religion/Sciences Religieuses 19, no. 4 (December 1, 1990): 413–26. p. 418. https://doi.org/10.1177/000842989001900403.
  3. Irwin, Lee. “Myth, Language and Ontology among the Huron.” Studies in Religion/Sciences Religieuses 19, no. 4 (December 1, 1990): 413–26. p. 419. https://doi.org/10.1177/000842989001900403.
  4. Irwin, Lee. “The Huron-Jesuit Relations: Contesting Dreams, Confirming Worldviews.” Religion 22 (1992): 259–70. p. 260.
  5. Irwin, Lee. “Myth, Language and Ontology among the Huron.” Studies in Religion/Sciences Religieuses 19, no. 4 (December 1, 1990): 413–26. https://doi.org/10.1177/000842989001900403. p. 419.
  6. Irwin, Lee. “Myth, Language and Ontology among the Huron.” Studies in Religion/Sciences Religieuses 19, no. 4 (December 1, 1990): 413–26. https://doi.org/10.1177/000842989001900403. p. 419.