Yaqona

The Yagona (Piper methysticum) (a.k.a. Kava) is a mild Connection Supplement used by the people of Fiji to lubricate discussion, open channels for healing, connect with the [Vu]], and draw Mana for healing.[1]

List of Connection Supplements

Connection Supplement > Ayahuasca, Cannabis, Chloroform, DMT, Haoma, Kaneh Bosm, Kava, Ketamine, Kykeon, LSD, MDMA, Maikua, Manna, Nitrous Oxide, Peyote, Psilocybin Mushroom, Santa Rosa, Soma, Tobacco, Yaqona

Notes

"A tall, leafy plant that grows to about five feet in height, yaqona is often cultivated as a cash crop. Its long, gnarled roots are dried, pounded or pulverized, then mixed with water to form a ceremonial drink."[2]

"Yaqona is a central ingredient in Fijian life. It is often said that “we Fijians cannot live without yaqona.” Mildly psychoactive, yaqona eventually produces a soporific effect. People become more congenial with moderate drinking; another common saying is that “without yaqona, we cannot have a good meeting,” meaning that yaqona encourages people to work together. As yaqona drinking proceeds, people become more relaxed and mellow, eventually entering a state of utter relaxation in which talk becomes less frequent and sleepiness takes over. An animated yaqona-drinking session often evolves into a still, slow-moving shadow play, lasting until the yaqona is finished. I was told by many different people that “yaqona is the best sleeping pill you can take.” Originally reserved for chiefs and for use in sacred ceremonies, everyone now drinks yaqona, and it is found not only in sacred settings but at almost every social gathering."[3]

"In the villages, groups made up mostly of men gather nearly every evening in one house or another to drink yaqona. Starting shortly after five or six, the session can go on until late evening. People then go home to eat dinner or go directly to bed. Because it occurs in the village, this nightly social drinking retains observance of the yaqona ritual and recognition of its connection with the Vu."[4]

Fijians use Yaqona to facilitate Connection and healing. The ceremony typically begins with an exchange of yaqona with the healer. Both the healer, the one being healed, and any others present, drink the beverage. "[5] Drinking the beverage opens a connection to the Vu.


Footnotes

  1. Katz, Richard. The Straight Path of the Spirit: Ancestral Wisdom and Healing Traditions in Fiji. Rochester, Vermont: Park Street Press, 1999
  2. Katz, Richard. The Straight Path of the Spirit: Ancestral Wisdom and Healing Traditions in Fiji. Rochester, Vermont: Park Street Press, 1999
  3. Katz, Richard. The Straight Path of the Spirit: Ancestral Wisdom and Healing Traditions in Fiji. Rochester, Vermont: Park Street Press, 1999
  4. Katz, Richard. The Straight Path of the Spirit: Ancestral Wisdom and Healing Traditions in Fiji. Rochester, Vermont: Park Street Press, 1999
  5. Katz, Richard. The Straight Path of the Spirit: Ancestral Wisdom and Healing Traditions in Fiji. Rochester, Vermont: Park Street Press, 1999