Psilocybin Mushroom

Psilocybin Mushrooms are Connection Supplements popular amongst ancient Mesoamericans, but forced under ground by the the western Church when it participated in the colonization of America's native people.[1]

List of Connection Supplements

Connection Supplement > Ayahuasca, Cannabis, Chloroform, DMT, Haoma, Kaneh Bosm, Kava, Ketamine, Kykeon, LSD, MDMA, Maikua, Nitrous Oxide, Peyote, Psilocybin Mushroom, Santa Rosa, Soma, Tobacco, Yaqona

Notes

Mushrooms visualized as little male or female beings, elves, duendes, tricksters, saint children, the blood of Christ..[2]

Allow one to speak with the Lords of the Mountains, the beings who are the masters of all things.[3]

"It was not only the gold and natural riches of Anahuac, the culture and art of Mesoamerica that astonished the Spanish priests and conquistadors who arrived in this land in the sixteenth century: the native medicines (comprising a "marvellous collection" of hallucinogenic plants) were also the objects of attention, study, and condemnation."[4] Hallucinogenic practices were seen as "demoniacal" an the practice was forced underground in most cases, but survived in Huautla, in Sierra Mazatec.

Mushrooms have the power to cure, and also give "the mystical force that creates the elevated, esoteric language of the shaman." [5]

Seen as teonanacatle - Flesh of the Gods.

Were given great respect by elders.

"...Sometime later I knew that the mushrooms were like God. That they gave wisdom, that they cured illnesses, and that our peole, since a long time ago, had eaten them. That they had power, that they were the blood of Christ."[6]

Mushrooms provide contact with the Little One Who Springs Forth.[7]

"Before Wasson nobody took the mushrooms only to find God. They were always taken for the sick to get well."[8]

Footnotes

  1. Estrada, Alvaro. Maria Sabina: Her Life and Chants. Translated by Henry Munn. Santa Barbara, California: Ross-Erikson, 1981
  2. Estrada, Alvaro. Maria Sabina: Her Life and Chants. Translated by Henry Munn. Santa Barbara, California: Ross-Erikson, 1981.
  3. Estrada, Alvaro. Maria Sabina: Her Life and Chants. Translated by Henry Munn. Santa Barbara, California: Ross-Erikson, 1981. p. 32.
  4. Estrada, Alvaro. Maria Sabina: Her Life and Chants. Translated by Henry Munn. Santa Barbara, California: Ross-Erikson, 1981. p. 23.
  5. Estrada, Alvaro. Maria Sabina: Her Life and Chants. Translated by Henry Munn. Santa Barbara, California: Ross-Erikson, 1981. p. 23.
  6. Maria Sabina quoted in Estrada, Alvaro. Maria Sabina: Her Life and Chants. Translated by Henry Munn. Santa Barbara, California: Ross-Erikson, 1981. p. 40.
  7. Estrada, Alvaro. Maria Sabina: Her Life and Chants. Translated by Henry Munn. Santa Barbara, California: Ross-Erikson, 1981. p. 47.
  8. Estrada, Alvaro. Maria Sabina: Her Life and Chants. Translated by Henry Munn. Santa Barbara, California: Ross-Erikson, 1981. p. 73.