Transformational Change

From The SpiritWiki
Jump to: navigation, search


Transformation Change is a Connection Outcome. According to William White, Transformational Change [TC] is a sudden, dramatic healing (for example, instant recovery from alcoholism) that can "forever rend a life into the temporal categories of before and after and leave in their psychological wake an essentially new person."[1].

White identifies five characteristics of TC which are a) sudden, unplanned, and unanticipated, b) vivid, c) comprehensive (as in a comprehensive and revolutionary change in character), d) positive, and e) enduring. White also outlines clinical implications for practitioners dealing with an individual who has experienced a TC event.

Syncretic Terms

Transformation > Quantum Change, Transformational Change

List of LP Connection Experience Types

Connection Experience Types> Activation Experience, Aesthetic Experience, Ascension Experience, Awakening Experience, Clearing Experience, Completion Experience, Deep Flow, Diminutive Experience, Dream Experience, Flow Experience, Forced Connection, Healing Experience, Intuitive Glimmering, Nadir Experience, Push Experience, Restorative Experience, Union Experience, Unity Experience

Notes

TC is related/another name for Quantum Change. In LP nomenclature, TC is an outcome of a combination of a Clearing Experience + Awakening Experience + (possibly) Unity Experience

"The evidence of such transformation exists in radical and sustained alterations of character, identity, and interpersonal relationships."[2]

Transformational change has a propensity to "catalyze large religious, social, and therapeutic movements."[3]

Examples cited by William include Saul of Tarsus, Mohammed, Buddha, Luther, Handsome Lake, Bill Wilson (Alcoholics Anonymous), Marty Mann, and Malcolm X).

TC often occurs at rock bottom, and often occurs during periods of "great social unrest within their cultural environments."[4]

Generally occur later in life, 25-64. [5]

Include a religious and secular variety.[6]

Miller and C'de baca note an insightful versus mystical type (see Quantum Change).



Footnotes

  1. White, William L. “Transformational Change: A Historical Review.” Journal of Clinical Psychology 60, no. 5 (May 2004): 461.
  2. White, William L. “Transformational Change: A Historical Review.” Journal of Clinical Psychology 60, no. 5 (May 2004): 461.
  3. White, William L. “Transformational Change: A Historical Review.” Journal of Clinical Psychology 60, no. 5 (May 2004): 461.
  4. White, William L. “Transformational Change: A Historical Review.” Journal of Clinical Psychology 60, no. 5 (May 2004): 461.
  5. White, William L. “Transformational Change: A Historical Review.” Journal of Clinical Psychology 60, no. 5 (May 2004): 464.
  6. White, William L. “Transformational Change: A Historical Review.” Journal of Clinical Psychology 60, no. 5 (May 2004): 461.
Spiritwiki References