Level of Consciousness

The phrase Levels of Consciousness refers to different phenomenological experiences of Consciousness, as experienced by a Physical Unit. "Higher states" of Consciousness are associated with stronger and more permanent connection, while lower states are associated with disconnection and sleep.

Related Terms

Consciousness > Fabric of Consciousness, Force, Hard Problem, Intensification of Consciousness, Level of Consciousness, Monad, Spiritual Ego, Structure of Consciousness, Tree of Consciousness, Undifferentiated Consciousness

Notes

The Upanishads

The Upanishads delineate three ordinary states of consciousness: waking, dreaming, and dreamless sleep. Each is real, but each has a higher order of reality. For beyond these three, the Upanishads say, is the unitive state, called simply “the fourth”: turiya. Entering this state is similar to waking up out of dream sleep: the individual passes from a lower level of reality to a higher one. The sages called the dream of waking life - the dream of separate, merely physical existence – by a suggestive name, maya. In general use the word meant a kind of magic, the power of a god or sorcerer to make a thing appear to be something else. In the Gita, maya becomes the creative power of the Godhead, the primal creative energy that makes unity appear as the world of innumerable separate things with “name and form.”[1]

Scheme One

Presence of a connection

Connected Consciousness

Disconnected Consciousness (low CQ connection, inattention to reality, guilt, shame, self, other directed hatred, isolation even in groups, addictions, anxieties, existential anxieties, lack of compassion,

Pathological Consciousness (almost total disconnection)

Scheme Two

By CQ (0 to 100) at any given moment. Average daily CQ

Scheme Three

Christ Consciousness / Krishna Consciousness, God Consciousness

Normal Consciousness Christ / Krishna Consciousness

God Consciousness

Unadulterated Consciousness


Footnotes

  1. Easwaran, Eknath, trans. The Upanishads: Introduced and Translated by Eknath Easwaran. Berkeley, California: Nilgiri Press, 1987. p. 28.