Difference between revisions of "Talk:Disjuncture"

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==Leo Tolstoy==
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<blockquote class="quotation">Whatever the opinions and degree of education of a man of to-day, whatever his shade of liberalism, whatever his school of philosophy, or of science, or of economics, however ignorant or superstitious he may be, every man of the present day knows that all men have an equal right to life and the good things of life, and that one set of people are no better nor worse than another, that all are equal. Everyone knows this, beyond doubt; everyone feels it in his whole being. Yet at the same time everyone sees all round him the division of men into two castes—the one, laboring, oppressed, poor, and suffering, the other idle, oppressing, luxurious, and profligate. And everyone not only sees this, but voluntarily or involuntarily, in one way or another, he takes part in maintaining this distinction which his conscience condemns. And he cannot help suffering from the consciousness of this contradiction and his share in it.
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Whether he be master or slave, the man of to-day cannot help constantly feeling the painful opposition between his conscience and actual life, and the miseries resulting from it.<ref>Tolstoy, Leo. The Kingdom of God Is Within You (Classics To Go) EBook: Leo Tolstoy: Amazon.ca: Gateway. Translated by Constance Garnett. CreateSpace, 2016. https://amzn.to/2Dg2jtj</ref>
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</blockquote>
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Bourgeault C. (2015) The Gospel of Mary Magdalene. Parabola. New York.[https://parabola.org/2015/01/29/the-gospel-of-mary-magdalene/]
 
Bourgeault C. (2015) The Gospel of Mary Magdalene. Parabola. New York.[https://parabola.org/2015/01/29/the-gospel-of-mary-magdalene/]
  
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Speaks of both [[Disjuncture]] and [[Alignment]] in [[The New Jerusalem (book)]].  
 
Speaks of both [[Disjuncture]] and [[Alignment]] in [[The New Jerusalem (book)]].  
  
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==Footnotes==
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<references />

Latest revision as of 20:07, 15 April 2019

Leo Tolstoy

Whatever the opinions and degree of education of a man of to-day, whatever his shade of liberalism, whatever his school of philosophy, or of science, or of economics, however ignorant or superstitious he may be, every man of the present day knows that all men have an equal right to life and the good things of life, and that one set of people are no better nor worse than another, that all are equal. Everyone knows this, beyond doubt; everyone feels it in his whole being. Yet at the same time everyone sees all round him the division of men into two castes—the one, laboring, oppressed, poor, and suffering, the other idle, oppressing, luxurious, and profligate. And everyone not only sees this, but voluntarily or involuntarily, in one way or another, he takes part in maintaining this distinction which his conscience condemns. And he cannot help suffering from the consciousness of this contradiction and his share in it.

Whether he be master or slave, the man of to-day cannot help constantly feeling the painful opposition between his conscience and actual life, and the miseries resulting from it.[1]


Bourgeault C. (2015) The Gospel of Mary Magdalene. Parabola. New York.[1]


=Emanuel Swedenborg

Speaks of both Disjuncture and Alignment in The New Jerusalem (book).


Footnotes

  1. Tolstoy, Leo. The Kingdom of God Is Within You (Classics To Go) EBook: Leo Tolstoy: Amazon.ca: Gateway. Translated by Constance Garnett. CreateSpace, 2016. https://amzn.to/2Dg2jtj