Difference between revisions of "Fruits of the Spirit"

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==Notes==
==Notes==


In [[Crest-Jewel of Wisdom]], there are many references to the "fruits" of liberation, the "fruits" of connection.  
In [[Crest-Jewel of Wisdom]], there are many references to the "fruits" of liberation, the "fruits" of connection.
 
[[Ralph Waldo Emerson]] speaks about some of the fruits of [[Connection]] in his essay on the Over-Soul <blockquote> </blockquote>


===Galatians 5:22===
===Galatians 5:22===


<blockquote class="quotation"> '''Fruits of the Spirit''': "But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law. Those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. Since we live by the Spirit, let us keep in step with the Spirit. Let us not become conceited, provoking and envying each other" <ref>Galatians 5: 22</ref></blockquote>
<blockquote class="quotation"> '''Fruits of the Spirit''': "But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law. Those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. Since we live by the Spirit, let us keep in step with the Spirit. Let us not become conceited, provoking and envying each other" <ref>Galatians 5: 22</ref></blockquote>Ralph Waldo Emerson refers to the  gifts of the Spirit as power, genius, virtue, and love.<blockquote>What we commonly call man, the eating, drinking, planting, counting man, does not, as we know hin, represent himself, but misrepresents himself. Him we do not respect, but the soul, whose organ he is, ''would he let it appear through his action, would make our knees bend''. When it breathes through his intellect" ''it is genius''; when it breathes through his will, ''it is virtu''e; when it flows through his affection, ''it is love''. <ref>Emerson, Ralph Waldo. “The Over-Soul.” In ''The Complete Essays and Other Writings of Ralp Waldo Emerson''. New York: Modern Library, 1950. p. 263. Emphasis added.</ref></blockquote>{{template:endstuff}}
 
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[[category:terms]]
[[category:terms]]
[[category:Buddhism]][[Is a syncretic term::Connection Outcome| ]]
[[category:Buddhism]][[Is a syncretic term::Connection Outcome| ]]

Latest revision as of 03:24, 18 October 2021


Fruits of the Spirit is a Christian term syncretic with the LP term Connection Outcome.

Syncretic Terms

Connection Outcome > Favours, Fruits of the Spirit, Gifts of the Spirit, Siddhi

Notes

In Crest-Jewel of Wisdom, there are many references to the "fruits" of liberation, the "fruits" of connection.

Ralph Waldo Emerson speaks about some of the fruits of Connection in his essay on the Over-Soul

Galatians 5:22

Fruits of the Spirit: "But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law. Those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. Since we live by the Spirit, let us keep in step with the Spirit. Let us not become conceited, provoking and envying each other" [1]

Ralph Waldo Emerson refers to the gifts of the Spirit as power, genius, virtue, and love.

What we commonly call man, the eating, drinking, planting, counting man, does not, as we know hin, represent himself, but misrepresents himself. Him we do not respect, but the soul, whose organ he is, would he let it appear through his action, would make our knees bend. When it breathes through his intellect" it is genius; when it breathes through his will, it is virtue; when it flows through his affection, it is love. [2]

==Footnotes==

  1. Galatians 5: 22
  2. Emerson, Ralph Waldo. “The Over-Soul.” In The Complete Essays and Other Writings of Ralp Waldo Emerson. New York: Modern Library, 1950. p. 263. Emphasis added.