Difference between revisions of "Egoic Collapse"

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<blockquote class="definition">'''Egoic Collapse''' is the pathological and permanent collapse of the [[Bodily Ego]] that occurs when a severely damaged ego makes a [[Connection]] to some point in [[The Fabric]].
<blockquote class="definition">'''Egoic Collapse''' is the pathological and permanent collapse of the [[Bodily Ego]] that occurs when a severely damaged ego makes a [[Connection]] to some point in [[The Fabric]]. Egoic collapse is characterized by a disordered sense of self, and an unconstrained and distorted connection to [[The Fabric]]
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==Notes==
==Notes==


Daniel Paul Schreber<ref>Schreber, Daniel Paul. Memoirs of My Nervous Illness. New York: NYRB Classics, 2000. https://amzn.to/2U8Se6Q.</ref> provides a rather dramatic account of what can happen when [[Bodily Ego]] becomes permanently collapses, thereby exposing the [[Bodily Ego]] to content, uncontrolled, and pathological contact with [[The Fabric]]. Schreber was a paranoid schizophrenic who recounted his [[Connection Experiences]] and the information that was "downloaded" from The Fabric. His memoir is an interesting recounting of spiritual truth mixed with psychotic and harmful delusions. The delusions probably arise from his incredibly toxic upbringing experiences, and the toxic ideas he had absorbed into his mental space as a consequence of the violence and indoctrination he endured. Daniel was a victim of the Moritz Schreber childcare system, a system of [[Toxic Socialization]] and childhood torture that emphasized "Suppression, control, [and] total obedience...' even to the point of threatening and instilling fear in infants.<ref>Schreber, Daniel Paul. Memoirs of My Nervous Illness. New York: NYRB Classics, 2000. p. xvi. https://amzn.to/2U8Se6Q.</ref>
Daniel Paul Schreber<ref>Schreber, Daniel Paul. Memoirs of My Nervous Illness. New York: NYRB Classics, 2000. https://amzn.to/2U8Se6Q.</ref> provides a rather dramatic account of what can happen when [[Bodily Ego]] permanently collapses, thereby exposing the [[Bodily Ego]] to content, uncontrolled, and pathological contact with [[The Fabric]]. Schreber was a paranoid schizophrenic who recounted his [[Connection Experiences]] and the information that was "downloaded" from The Fabric. His memoir is an interesting recounting of spiritual truth mixed with psychotic and harmful delusions. The delusions probably arise from his incredibly toxic upbringing experiences, and the toxic ideas he had absorbed into his mental space as a consequence of the violence and indoctrination he endured. Daniel was a victim of the Moritz Schreber childcare system, a system of [[Toxic Socialization]] and childhood torture that emphasized "Suppression, control, [and] total obedience...' even to the point of threatening and instilling fear in infants.<ref>Schreber, Daniel Paul. Memoirs of My Nervous Illness. New York: NYRB Classics, 2000. p. xvi. https://amzn.to/2U8Se6Q.</ref>


Scharfstein carries on an interesting discussion of "psychotic mysticism" where he suggests that a mystical psychosis involves "the sense of drastic separation from everything....the loss of oneself in fusion with other people and things...and...fear and guilt that acquire a hallucinatory presence.<ref>Scharfstein, Ben-Ami. Mystical Experience. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1973. p. 133 </ref> He cites the case of one Daniel Paul Schreber<ref>Schreber, Daniel Paul. Memoirs of My Nervous Illness. NYRB Classics, 2000. https://amzn.to/2U8Se6Q.</ref> who describe a nervous illness in which he had "nerve contact" with God, and that there were nerve-filaments that connected all other souls in the universe to each other, and that his filaments were poisoned and that "diseased nervous system." Essentially, Schreber is describing a diseased connection.  
Scharfstein carries on an interesting discussion of "psychotic mysticism" where he suggests that a mystical psychosis involves "the sense of drastic separation from everything....the loss of oneself in fusion with other people and things...and...fear and guilt that acquire a hallucinatory presence.<ref>Scharfstein, Ben-Ami. Mystical Experience. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1973. p. 133 </ref> He cites the case of one Daniel Paul Schreber<ref>Schreber, Daniel Paul. Memoirs of My Nervous Illness. NYRB Classics, 2000. https://amzn.to/2U8Se6Q.</ref> who describe a nervous illness in which he had "nerve contact" with God, and that there were nerve-filaments that connected all other souls in the universe to each other, and that his filaments were poisoned and that "diseased nervous system." Essentially, Schreber is describing a diseased connection.  

Latest revision as of 15:54, 28 November 2021

Egoic Collapse is the pathological and permanent collapse of the Bodily Ego that occurs when a severely damaged ego makes a Connection to some point in The Fabric. Egoic collapse is characterized by a disordered sense of self, and an unconstrained and distorted connection to The Fabric

Connection Pathologies

Connection Pathology > Communication Error, Connection Catastrophe, Connection Psychosis, Constricted Connection, Double-N Mysticism, Ego Inflation, Egoic Collapse, Egoic Explosion, Flooding, Gurutitus, Jadhb, Learned Helplessness, Majdhub, Spiritual Emergency

Syncretic Terms

Egoic Collapse > Jadhb, Majdhub, Nadir Experience, Psychotic Mysticism, Schizophrenia

Related Terms

Connection Pathology : Egoic Collapse > Egoic Explosion

Notes

Daniel Paul Schreber[1] provides a rather dramatic account of what can happen when Bodily Ego permanently collapses, thereby exposing the Bodily Ego to content, uncontrolled, and pathological contact with The Fabric. Schreber was a paranoid schizophrenic who recounted his Connection Experiences and the information that was "downloaded" from The Fabric. His memoir is an interesting recounting of spiritual truth mixed with psychotic and harmful delusions. The delusions probably arise from his incredibly toxic upbringing experiences, and the toxic ideas he had absorbed into his mental space as a consequence of the violence and indoctrination he endured. Daniel was a victim of the Moritz Schreber childcare system, a system of Toxic Socialization and childhood torture that emphasized "Suppression, control, [and] total obedience...' even to the point of threatening and instilling fear in infants.[2]

Scharfstein carries on an interesting discussion of "psychotic mysticism" where he suggests that a mystical psychosis involves "the sense of drastic separation from everything....the loss of oneself in fusion with other people and things...and...fear and guilt that acquire a hallucinatory presence.[3] He cites the case of one Daniel Paul Schreber[4] who describe a nervous illness in which he had "nerve contact" with God, and that there were nerve-filaments that connected all other souls in the universe to each other, and that his filaments were poisoned and that "diseased nervous system." Essentially, Schreber is describing a diseased connection.

A damaged bodily ego does not have the strength to cope with and contain powerful Consciousness. Upon connection it may experience additional trauma. This additional trauma may further damage the bodily ego, leading to fragmentation (disordered thinking) or even dissolution (Personality Confusion).

Old Energy Archetypes, coupled with emotional and psychological disease, can contribute to/exacerbate a psychotically tainted connection.

Egoic collapse may be rapid, arising from a single dramatic Connection Experience, or it can unfold over time, for example as the result of long term Entheogen Abuse by an individual raised in an extremely toxic environment.

Footnotes

  1. Schreber, Daniel Paul. Memoirs of My Nervous Illness. New York: NYRB Classics, 2000. https://amzn.to/2U8Se6Q.
  2. Schreber, Daniel Paul. Memoirs of My Nervous Illness. New York: NYRB Classics, 2000. p. xvi. https://amzn.to/2U8Se6Q.
  3. Scharfstein, Ben-Ami. Mystical Experience. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1973. p. 133
  4. Schreber, Daniel Paul. Memoirs of My Nervous Illness. NYRB Classics, 2000. https://amzn.to/2U8Se6Q.