Difference between revisions of "Ascension"

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Ascension results in a more aligned existence. A more aligned existence is something we strive for while connecting, but it is also the "fruit" of alignment, when alignment leads to connection. [https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Galatians+5%3A22-26&version=NIV Galatians 5: 22-26]
 
Ascension results in a more aligned existence. A more aligned existence is something we strive for while connecting, but it is also the "fruit" of alignment, when alignment leads to connection. [https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Galatians+5%3A22-26&version=NIV Galatians 5: 22-26]
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Sufism places a premium of ascension/ascent to union with God. In Sufism, ascension is often symbolized as a bird's flight to heaven, "who then settles on the celestial tree in paradise and consumes its fruit; he is then transformed with divine knowledge and engages in intimate conversations with God....Powerful visions of ascension were recorded by many other Sufis."<ref>Ernst, Carl W. The Shambhala Guide to Sufism. Boston: Shambhala Publications, 1997. https://amzn.to/2SoFmun. p. 48. </ref>
  
 
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Latest revision as of 23:05, 21 September 2019


Ascension refers to the process of union/merging between Bodily Ego and Spiritual Ego (or some other monadic location within the Fabric of Consciousness,[1] that is facilitated with persistent and consistent Connection Practice.[2]

Syncretic Terms

Ascension > Beatific Vision, Divine Union, Gifts of the Spirit, It, Perfect Contemplation, Spiritual Marriage, The Unity, Union, Union with Reality

Notes

Ascension - The body's consciousness, the Bodily Ego, ascends and merges with its own Highest Self.

In cabbalistic terms, ascension is the process of raising Malkuth (a.k.a. the Kingdom) back up to Kether (a.k.a. the Crown)

In Vedic terms connection with Highest Self is the meaning of the term yoga (union) and the goal of yogic practice.

In Christian terms, ascension/connection is described as

  • baptism with the Holy Spirit. "I baptize you with water, but he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit." Mark 1: 8 or
  • the descent of the Holy Spirit, "When all the people were being baptized, Jesus was baptized too. And as he was praying, heaven was opened 22 and the Holy Spirit descended on him in bodily form like a dove." Luke 3: 21-22.
  • Paul speaks of his "ascension" connection as the destruction of "I" (i.e. little self" and dominance of "Christ" (i.e. Highest Self). "I have been crucified with Christ and I no longer live, but Christ lives in me. " (Galatians 3: 20).
  • Union, Divine Union, Spiritual Marriage, Spiritual Bethrothal, etc.

The poem "I am/We Are" is a poem about the union between Bodily Ego and Spiritual Ego that occurs as a consequence of Connection and the process of Ascension which occurs.[3]

The Dove Logo is a symbol of ascension/connection/descent of the Holy Spirit/Yoga/Union

Ascension results in a more aligned existence. A more aligned existence is something we strive for while connecting, but it is also the "fruit" of alignment, when alignment leads to connection. Galatians 5: 22-26

Sufism places a premium of ascension/ascent to union with God. In Sufism, ascension is often symbolized as a bird's flight to heaven, "who then settles on the celestial tree in paradise and consumes its fruit; he is then transformed with divine knowledge and engages in intimate conversations with God....Powerful visions of ascension were recorded by many other Sufis."[4]


Footnotes

  1. Sosteric. “Mysticism, Consciousness, Death.” Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 7, no. 11 (2016): 1099–1118.
  2. Sosteric. Rocket Scientists’ Guide to Authentic Spirituality. St. Albert, Alberta: Lightning Path Press, Unpublished Draft. https://press.lightningpath.org/product/rocket-scientists-guide-authentic-spirituality/.
  3. Sharp, Michael. “I Am/We Are.” Blog of Michael Sharp, 2003. https://www.michaelsharp.org/i-amwe-are/.
  4. Ernst, Carl W. The Shambhala Guide to Sufism. Boston: Shambhala Publications, 1997. https://amzn.to/2SoFmun. p. 48.
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