Consciousness

Template:Consciousnessnav

Consciousness is awareness pure and simple.[1]

Syncretic Terms

Fabric of Consciousness > Ain Soph Aur, God, Original I

Related Terms

Consciousness > Fabric of Consciousness, Force, Hard Problem, Intensification of Consciousness, Level of Consciousness, Monad, Spiritual Ego, Structure of Consciousness, Tree of Consciousness, Undifferentiated Consciousness

States of Consciousness

Consciousness exists in several states, characterized by the presence or absence of instantiated monads, and the particular stage of emanation (Arba/Sosteric).

Differentiated Consciousness, Emanating Consciousness, Fabric of Consciousness, Undifferentiated Consciousness

Notes

In popular usage, the term is typically used to refer to either Bodily Ego, Spiritual Ego (if theorized), or some undifferentiated combination of both.

At one time suggesting such a thing as Spiritual Ego would have been quite radical, now there is growing speculation that a non-naturalistic view of consciousness, i.e. consciousness is not tied to the material universe, is simply common sense.[2]

From a common-sense perspective, we are intimately aware of consciousness, and it is a truism that consciousness has a variety of properties (among them qualia, intentionality, and non-spatiality) that are so different from those of matter that it is difficult if not impossible to see how consciousness could ever have been produced by matter. The problems that arise here are formidable, and have given rise to what has recently become popularized as 'the hard problem' of explaining the existence of consciousness in a material universe. These problems have led some thinkers, like McGinn, to insist that we cannot explain the existence of consciousness in a material universe at all, and others, like Chalmers, to suggest that we need to revise our notion of matter to include consciousness as a fundamental property of nature, along with mass, charge, and gravitation.[3]

Chalmers suggests that an essential feature of Consciousness is a sense of a cognitive agent (i.e. Ego), and also that there is a felt feeling of experience."There is also an internal aspect; there is something it feels like to be a cognitive agent. "I am talking only about the subjective quality of experience: what it is like to be a cognitive agent."[4]

Conscious experiences range from vivid color sensations to experiences of the faintest background aromas; from hard-edged pains to the elusive experience of thoughts on the tip of one’s tongue; from mundane sounds and smells to the encompassing grandeur of musical experience; from the triviality of a nagging itch to the weight of a deep existential angst; from the specificity of the taste of peppermint to the generality of one’s experience of selfhood. All these have a distinct experienced quality.[5] He summarizes, "when I talk about consciousness, I am talking only about the subjective quality of experience: what it is like to be a cognitive agent."[6]

Footnotes

  1. Chalmers, David. The Conscious Mind: In Search of a Fundamental Theory. Kindle. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. https://amzn.to/2Vzq5HW. Also Shear, Jonathan. “Mysticism and Scientific Naturalism.” Sophia 43, no. 1 (May 2004): 83–99. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02782439.
  2. Shear, Jonathan. “Mysticism and Scientific Naturalism.” Sophia 43, no. 1 (May 2004): 85. https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02782439.
  3. Chalmers, David. The Conscious Mind: In Search of a Fundamental Theory. Kindle. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. https://amzn.to/2Vzq5HW. p. 6.
  4. Chalmers, David. The Conscious Mind: In Search of a Fundamental Theory. Kindle. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. https://amzn.to/2Vzq5HW.
  5. Chalmers, David. The Conscious Mind: In Search of a Fundamental Theory. Kindle. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. https://amzn.to/2Vzq5HW.